Day 210 – Adios Texas

We left Port Aransas in the cold, dense fog, passed through Castroville where it was sweating hot, spent two nights on the Rio Frio River in Concan, where it was freezing cold, and finally emerged in Del Rio, where it was 80°, sunny, and clear. I emerged with an infection in both ears, caused by perpetual moisture! Fourteen days of washes and ointments and pills – yech!  The only redeeming factor was the wonderful staff at the Del Rio Veterinary Diagnostic Hospital; they were all very friendly and gave me lots of love (and treats). In Del Rio the Boss spilled a glass of red wine on her laptop, rendering it in operable – the way she cried and moaned you would think it was her whose ears were aching; what a baby! I know she hates sharing Mr. Big’s laptop, but he has warned her many times about the dangers of drinking and computing…

We spent an overnight at the picturesque Marathon Motel and RV Park in Marathon where the grounds were interesting and the sunset was incredible (actually, I am color blind so I only know this because of the oohs and aahs) then ambled down to the Rio Grande Village RV Park for a week in Big Bend National Park.

at the Marathon Motel…

Big Bend is home to magnificent vistas, rugged mountains, extraordinary rock formations, hiking-trails galore, and the Rio-Grande River (which serves as a natural boundary with Mexico). On our first night B&B (in search of a sunset) took a hike on the nature trail that looped around the adjacent primitive campground – leaving me (thank the dog gods) behind in the air-conditioned Enterprise. The next day we spent six hours on the Ross Maxwell Scenic Drive, making all the requisite stops for photo-ops and scenic wonders. I had a good time but was exhausted by the time we got home. I also was allowed to make the trips to Boquillas Canyon (where we saw banditos making illegal-to-buy trinkets on the Mexico side of the Rio Grande), the Hot Springs, and Dagger Flats. All in all, B&B liked Big Bend – especially the sunrises, rainbows, sunsets, and moonrises.

In Big Bend National Park…

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On the Nature Walk

the Ross Maxwell Scenic Drive

Boquillas Canyon and the Hot Springs

Dagger Flat Auto Trail

Early Morning, Rainbows, Sunset, and Moonrises

Terlingua was next, with a visit to the old Terlingua Ghost Town and its renowned “Porch” and Starlight Theatre. We had a great patio-lunch at a nearby restaurant; the food was good (I got tidbits), but the company was better – all the waiters had dogs (one I think was a wolf) that were allowed to roam free and be friendly with the patrons! But Having missed the 51st Annual Terlingua International Championship Chili Cookoff, I was actually rather bored… the ghost town itself was deserted!

Finally we arrived at Fort Davis (our last major stop in Texas), a beautiful and historic town high in the mountains of West Texas and home to the McDonald Observatory and the Davis Mountains State Park. The Boss was so excited – she had made reservations to attend the Star Party that was scheduled to take place on our first night there – but the bad weather that had been following us around the country ruined everything; it was freezing cold and totally overcast – no stars visible at all! Fighting off her disappointment, the following morning they drove up to the Observatory to inquire if there were any openings that evening for the 82” telescope special viewing session (astronomers sometimes wait for months to use this telescope), but unfortunately it was totally booked (14 persons). So, what else was there to do but shop??? New hoodies all around!

While staying in the State Park I took some great walks, but didn’t see any mountain lions (the ranger said I might) and we made the Skyline Drive trip several times. The Boss was very upset that no matter where we camp, we always get stuck next to some city slickers that insist on having bright spotlights on their motorhomes – lights that shine right into the windows of the Enterprise and/or light up the night sky, really blocking out the inky darkness, milkyway, constellations, and stars. And I have to agree with her – what are they afraid of?

 

 

Anyway, once again, Adios Texas; we won’t be back on this trip!

Day 188 – Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas – Thanksgiving to New Year’s Eve

Mostly overnights and one-day stays describes our travels between Thanksgiving and New Year’s. Not so much fun for me (or anyone else for that matter) – days were spent driving and nights in not-so-wonderful RV parks.  But once we got to our “destinations” how things changed!

We spent six great days in “destination” Apache Junction at the Arizonian RV Resort where the Superstition Mountains loomed out our back door. B&B went ATVing (right from our site) several times in the neighboring Arizona Trust Lands and Gold Canyon and made a day trip out to Box Canyon in the Florence Coke Ovens. I liked the RV park – there were plenty of friendly dogs to smell and it was large enough for a different long walk every day.

Gold Canyon…

Florence Coke Ovens and the Box Canyon…

 

Not a “destination”, but three horrible days were spent in Tucson, Arizona – horrible because I was dragged to PetSmart and forced to get a bath and a haircut and then spent two days recovering!  The Boss, however, had a good time playing at night with her new camera… 

I don't need no stinkin' bath!
I don’t need no stinkin’ bath!
On the only clear night
On the only clear night

 

Onwards to New Mexico. While driving from Lordsburg to Carlsbad we had to pass through a) the Guadalupe Mountains in Texas where we had our first (but not last) taste of winter – ice and snow covering twisty mountain roads and b) the not-so-lovely city of El Paso with its scary wall. I heard they eat dogs there…

In the Guadalupe National Mountains…

 

We then made tracks to Grapevine, Texas to spend time with Mr. Big’s sister and brother-in-law, Phyllis and Richard. I remembered their house from our last visit, and barged right in when we arrived – being careful not to knock down the Christmas Tree or swipe any of the knick-knacks with my tail. Richard became my new best friend – he generously shared his ham dinner with me and snuck me treats that I had never had before. He must feed his motorcycle the same way – it’s almost as big as I! B&B loved Grapevine; it was decorated to the hilt for Christmas and had lots of restaurants and “boutiques” for holiday tourists (like the Boss who bought herself yet another cowboy shirt). We stayed at The Vineyards, Grapevine’s beautiful municipal RV park (which had been under 20 feet of water two years before) and all agreed that it was the best municipal park e-v-e-r!

 

 

Still in Texas we passed through Waco (actually Elm Mott) where winter weather got us again; it was 20 degrees with a wind-chill of 04. Needless to say Mr. Big and I walked alone – the Boss would not leave the Enterprise!

Afterwards, we spent a few cold, overcast nights in Leander on the Bravos River (just outside of Austin) and then, “destination” San Antonio!

Looking forward to having Christmas Dinner on the Riverwalk, we parked the Enterprise at the Traveler’s World Carefree RV Resort, about two miles outside of the city. It was a good site; wide enough to be comfortable and long enough to unload the ATV and park it behind the rig. Best of all, it was directly across the way from the dog park which, incredibly, was made of astro-turf! I’ve never seen anything like it before, but it was easy on the paws… Too bad it was either too cold or too overcast to spend much time outdoors, but we walked, several times, along the San Antonio Riverwalk where it meanders past the RV Park (I wasn’t allowed downtown – too many people).   Christmas Eve Day B&B went to Market Square to eat, drink, and be merry and by Christmas Eve the Boss wasn’t feeling well (I wonder why???)  so, no special Christmas Dinner – for any of us.

On Christmas Monday we hopped into the truck and drove to Seguin, Texas where our ancestor Nathaniel Benton (1811 – 1872, 2nd cousin 5X removed) lived and served as a Texas Ranger. We visited the historical Magnolia Hotel and the Old Vaughan Cemetery where Nathaniel is buried and where the State of Texas has erected a memorial headstone in his honor. The town of Seguin was named after Juan Seguin who fought in the Texas Revolution with Sam Houston, defeating Santa Ana. Initially, he was at the Alamo but was ordered to ride to Houston’s camp and alert the army of the dire situation. After the battle he was ordered back to the Alamo to bury the dead, ensuring “Christian” burials.

On our last night in San Antonio, B&B did the Riverwalk in town. It turned out to be a good night – college football fans were out celebrating the upcoming Alamo Bowl and there was a pep rally and a “battle of the bands” going on. Tough not to get caught up in the excitement!

at Traveler’s World RV…

 

at the Market Square…

 

In Seguin…

 

On the Riverwalk…

 

And here we are in Port Aransas, Texas at the Pioneer Beach Resort where it’s cool and rainy with dense fog almost every morning. On the one morning (so far) with no fog there was a pretty sunrise over the Gulf and later in the day I got to run loose on the beach – everyone knows that’s my favorite activity! Tonight is New Year’s Eve – we’ll be making a run for fresh shrimp soon – I hope I can stay awake until at least 10pm!

One pretty sunrise…

Me on the beach…

 

Happy New Year to Everyone! Man’s best friend, Buster.

 

Day 150 – California, top to bottom…

In total we spent 40 days in California, zig-zagging from Crescent City all the way down to El Centro.

The offshore geography of Crescent City makes it unusually susceptible to tsunamis, and much of the city was destroyed by four tsunami waves generated by the Good Friday earthquake off Anchorage, Alaska in 1964. More recently, the city’s harbor suffered extensive damage and destruction due to tsunamis generated by the March 11, 2011 earthquake off Sendai, Japan. Thank goodness it only rained continuously for the two days we were there – we never even left the Hiouchi RV Park.

We spent three days in Eureka at the Shoreline RV Park. The weather was generally ugly and it poured down rain for a day and a half – no Victorian House Tours for the Boss.  But I got lucky… on the single sunny day we went out to Samoa Dunes where I got to play, off leash, on the beach and in the Pacific!

Samoa Dunes…

On to Redding where B&B took the Black Dog for a great ride in the Chappie Shasta ORV Area while I rested up and guarded the Motorhome in the Mountain Gate RV Park. We had been to Redding once before and liked the area with its accessibility to the Sacramento River, Mt. Shasta, and the Lake Shasta Dam – it’s very beautiful!

Chappie-Shasta ORV Area…

In Lakeport, it rained like Hades for one day and was too wet to ride on the next, so I got lucky again – lunch on the patio of the Park Place Restaurant and a stroll in the pleasant city park.

Lunch in Lakeport…

We spent an overnight in Napa at the horrible Napa Valley Expo RV Park and continued on our merry way to the Yosemite KOA in Coarsegold the next day.  The drive through Napa Valley was very scenic (grape vines everywhere), but despite the Boss’ begging, there was no stopping for lunch in touristy Calistoga.

The Boss was disappointed; we had been to Yosemite before and it was beautiful, but this time (at the end of October) it seemed dull and dry, and the bark-beetle damage was devastating. Because we were only there for two nights, there was no ATVing.

Yosemite National Park…

Back to the coast and the Moss Landing KOA.  There was no ATVing in or around Moss Landing, but there was plenty of eating. The two walking-distance Mexican restaurants (the Whole Enchilada and the Haute Enchilada) were, according to Mr. Big, the best ever.  Of course I wouldn’t know – I’m not allowed to eat Mexican!  Being so close to beautiful Monterey Bay we made the trek to Pebble Beach where the closest B&B got to a round of golf was a visit to the Pro Shop. The Boss had a good laugh when she saw a golfer having his shoes “blown off” by his caddy!

Monterey Bay…

Pismo Beach and the Le Sage Riviera RV Park. I loved it there! At least three times a day, every day, we walked to the Pismo Beach State Park where I met my first Hippies (leftovers from the 60’s the Boss tells me). I didn’t actually go in the Pacific or even on the beach proper, but there were boardwalks and trails (and dogs) galore. The weather was great and the smells were wonderful! California people are strange (they bring me steak bones and sleep on the ground) but that’s OK with me.  Oh, B&B did take a day to go ATVing at Pozo La Panza OHV in the Los Padres National Forest – they had the best rollercoaster ride ever.

Pozo La Panza OHV…

In Goleta we stayed at the Ocean Mesa at El Capitan (near Santa Barbara) – a very expensive “resort” that was attractive but needed just a little more work to make it worth the price.  And there was, literally, nothing to do!  With the Black Dog on the truck, B&B made a long but scenic drive to the Divide Peak OHV Route in the Los Padres National Forest only to be accosted by some guy on a motorcycle who told them that they “could not take the Black Dog on the trails.”  When the Boss (sweetly) asked him who he was, the guy backed off and claimed to be an ex-forest ranger, and that side-by-sides were discouraged on the Divide – only motorcycles and ATVs were sanctioned. Well, the Black Dog met the 50″ or less posted requirements, so (after much back and forth) B&B proceeded to hit the trail BUT they couldn’t get past the first gate – too big! Oh well, they had to pack it in and head back.

 in Los Padres National Forest…

Adelanto, the “armpit of the desert” and the Adelanto RV ParkWARNING – Never go to Adelanto!  For a dozen miles along the road “there is empty scrub only occasionally dotted with gas stations, truck stops, housing estates, trailer parks, fast-food restaurants and an immigrant detention facility.”   Understandably, the Boss was cranked out so we didn’t go anywhere or do anything.  Not even any pictures. (Who planned this stop???)

In Banning we stayed at the Banning Stagecoach KOA and B&B took the Black Dog out on the Bee Canyon Truck Trail in the San Bernardino National Forest. It was really just a jeep trail with plenty of hills, rocks, gullies, and great mountain views, but it was a good ride, and the Boss used the GO PRO to record it – too bad she accidentally deleted the video…

Bee Canyon Truck Trail…

One night, while looking at a map, the Boss saw how close we were to Palomar Mountain and the famous Palomar Observatory, so we changed our trip, cutting out the beautiful (but very crowded) Chula Vista and headed to the Pala Casino and RV Resort in Pala (one of the nicest places we have ever stayed).  The drive over Palomar Mountain to the Observatory (part of Cal Tech University) was great – twisty-turny and very scenic, and although there was no public viewing or star parties going on, we had a good time walking around the grounds. Ha, ha – funny sign on the mountain “no throwing snowballs at passing vehicles.”  Also, the Pala Casino hosted a Military Ball on the night B&B went to throw away their money -the Boss was drooling (worse than I ever have) over all the handsome young Marines in full dress uniform!

at the Palomar Observatory…

 

There was plenty of riding in Borrego Springs (which is smack in the middle of the Anza-Borrego Desert State Park), and the Ocotillo Wells OHV Area was accessible right from our site at the Leapin’ Lizard RV! Needless to say, I spent quite a bit of time alone while B&B had a great time carousing around in the desert for two days.

Ocotillo Wells OHV Area…

 

Last, but not least, was our stay in El Cento. Here B&B experienced true “dune riding” when a neighbor at the Sunbeam Lake RV Resort offered to ride with them in the Superstition Mountain OHV Area (which is, incidentally, surrounded by military bombing ranges). Well, his ATV was a powerful Yamaha, made for sand while the Black Dog is a much smaller ATV made primarily for narrow forest and mountain trails. The sand was deep and soft and the dunes were high; the Black Dog couldn’t “follow the leader” and at one point sunk in the sand (maybe Mr. Big should have put on the paddle tires) and had to be dug out and then pushed out. After that fiasco the Boss was skittish and demanded that they quit. It took almost an hour for them to find their way back – avoiding steep dunes and soft-looking sand where ever possible. Not a happy puppy when she got back to the Enterprise, the Boss did admit she had a good time – but no more dunes unless they rent a dune buggy!

 

Later in our trip we’ll be spending more time in California, but for now – on to Arizona!

Day 110 – Travels through the Beaver State

Our two-week trek across Oregon, the Beaver State, began after leaving Kennewick, Washington and ended in North Bend, just north of Coos Bay.  At least half the time it rained and only once did the temperature exceed 60 – I guess no one told Mr. Big that October is the beginning of the rainy season in Oregon!

Kennewick, WA…

Columbia Sun RV Resort
Columbia Sun RV Resort

We went from the attractively manicured, suburban Columbia Sun RV Resort in Kennewick, WA to the Morrow County OHV Park in Oregon which was 50 miles from the nearest town, gas, grocery, and AT&T cell!   However, the trails were great and B&B enjoyed themselves.  I always like woodsy places, so it was OK by me.

I think its time to explain the difference between ATVs and UTVs.  Both are OHVs/ORVs (off-highway vehicles); an ATV has three wheels (like a tricycle) sometimes four, seats one (sometimes two, one behind the other), has handlebars, is straddled, and is less than 50″ wide and under 800 lbs.  A UTV has 4 wheels, a steering wheel, seats anywhere between one and four persons, is over 800 lbs, and can be less than or more than 50″ wide.  Trails are designated as: for motorcycles/dirt bikes only, ATVs only, UTV’s under 50″, UTVs 50″ or less, UTVs, OHVs, or any combinations.  Yikes, very confusing.  Anyway, the Black Dog is a 50″ side-by-side, 2-person UTV but we all refer to it as an ATV…

Morrow County OHV Park…

Back to civilization and the Crooked River Ranch RV Park near Terrebonne, OR.  There were no trails nearby to ride, but the area was very scenic.  There was a dog walk area (and plenty of signs for me to keep off the grass), but I was warned by a friendly worker to not walk there because of all the small cactus plants – go figure!

Crooked River Ranch…

B&B had expected to ride while in Tillamook (and get some world-famous Tillamook Cheese), but we ended up staying there for only one night – the Ashley Inn had misrepresented their RV sites (no full hookups)!  So, we headed north to Astoria, OR and the KOA across from Ft. Stevens State Park (where I had a wonderful time in the Pacific Ocean and on the beach).  It rained almost the whole time we were there – no fun for you-know-who!  –  but we did drive up to Cape Disappointment State Park to hike out to the lighthouse.

Fort Stevens…

 

Cape Disappointment…

Back to the Boonies – Westfir, OR and Casey’s Riverside RV Park.  We all liked it there, right on the North Branch of the Willamette River, and B&B found a wonderful place to ride in the Willamette National ForestHuckleberry Flats!

Casey’s RV and ATVing at Huckleberry Flats…

Last stop – Oregon Dunes KOA in North Bend, OR.  The Oregon Dunes National Recreational Area in the Siuslaw National Forest is one of the few places in Oregon where OHVs are allowed on the beach and we have actually stayed at the KOA before, on our way to Alaska in 2013.  At that time we were not carting the ATV, and the park was so noisy and dusty the Boss vowed never to return.  This time around was different. The park was almost empty and riding the dunes out to the beach was, by all accounts, an exhilarating experience.  The Boss’s biggest fear is of tipping over, but Mr. Big must be a good driver as that has not happened yet, even in the sand.  On the single sunny day, after ATVing on the dunes, we drove up to the Umpqua River Lighthouse where I dragged the Boss down a huge, high, long sand dune.  Then, I had to drag her back up!

Oregon Dunes in the rain and in the sun…

Umpqua River Lighthouse…

 

California, here I come!

Day 88 – September in Idaho

Just across the Wyoming border lies Island Park, ID where we stayed at the Redrock RV, a wide-open campground that had a great dog-walk, awesome views of the surrounding Centennial Mountains and the Targhee and Gallatin National Forests and, most important, ATV trail access. It rained and snowed while we were there but B&B were able to take (on the only precipitation-free day) the Black Dog up to the top of Sawtelle Mountain (about 10K feet high) where the FAA has a Radar Tracking Facility. They were amazed that there was absolutely no security on the site – no fences, no huge warning signs, nada – so unlike anything on the East Coast! From the summit they could see the Tetons in WY, Yellowstone in Montana, Henry Lake (by our campground) and more Idaho mountains. Back at the campground… the Aspens that lined the roadway were just starting to turn and, because we it was Labor Day, the Idahoans (??? – the fresh Boss calls them potato heads) were out in full force, most towing their ORVs. BTW… “Island Park was incorporated by owners of the many lodges and resorts along U.S. Route 20 in 1947, primarily to circumvent Idaho’s liquor laws that prohibited the sale of liquor outside of city limits. It is only 500 feet wide in most locations and, at 33 miles, claims to have the longest “Main Street” in the world”.

Redrock RV…

Sawtelle Peak…

 

There was no riding at Heise Hot Springs RV (supposedly one of Southeast Idaho’s best vacation spots) in Ririe, ID – we spent all our time getting the Silverado serviced (malfunctioning electrical supply from the Enterprise caused the brakes to turn on while being towed and consequently burned them out). The only good thing was that I got to ride in the backseat of a tiny little courtesy car; what fun! Oh, and the moose that strolled out in front of the Enterprise as we were leaving…

 

If you like the mountains, you would love Mackay (Mackie), a small western town in the Lost River Valley. Surrounded by the highest mountains in Idaho (Borah Peak is 12,667 ft.), it is home to the Mackay Reservoir and the Big Lost River, and on the morning of October 28, 1983, it was rocked by the largest earthquake ever recorded in Idaho (measuring 6.9 on the Richter scale) and most damaging (an estimated $12.5 million between Mackay and Challis) that Idaho has seen in recorded history! While there, we stayed at the Moose Crossing RV Park (which is in the path of the August 17th 2017 Solar Eclipse and will experience more than two minutes of total darkness at about 11:00 am) and B&B spent two great days ATVing in the Challis National Forest. In the late 1800’s, gold, copper, lead, zinc and silver deposits were found just southwest of town in the White Knob Mountains, and there were great trails all around and through the abandoned mines.

Moose Crossing RV…

ATVing in the Challis National Forest and around Mackay…

 

Old Sawmill Station on Highway 75 along the wonderful Salmon River in Clayton was our next stop. Clayton is a “town” in Custer County, Idaho; population 7 in the 2010 census (down from 27 in 2000), and its name is derived from early resident Clayton Smith, who is alleged to have been the owner of a bawdy house (what’s a bawdy house???).  Sawmill Station had a large open field set up for RVs, and since we were just about the only customers, we had the best spot (ha ha). It also claimed to serve the best burgers in Idaho (ha ha) and it had a dog park (ha ha)! The weather in Clayton was colder, damp, and mostly overcast, with the clouds hanging low – covering the mountain tops, but B&B did get in an early morning ride into the Salmon-Challis National Forest.

Old Sawmill Station RV…

 

In the Salmon-Challis National Forest…

 

The Boss got lucky… on the night of this year’s Harvest Moon we were in Cascade, ID at the Water’s Edge RV Resort and she got some good photos. The Boise National Forest turned out to be quite beautiful and the ATVing was great (it must have been- they were gone for hours!). We liked it here so much that the Boss picked up a Real-Estate brochure – only to put it back down after viewing the first three pages of Million-Dollar-Plus ranches.

Water’s Edge RV Park…

Mr. Big was disappointed with the non-existence of geo-spatial coded maps for the Clearwater District of the Nez Perce National Forest outside of Grangeville, ID. The only maps available were hard-copy, and although better than nothing, hard-copy doesn’t prevent one from getting lost or enlighten one as to where he is at any given point in time (another reason for me to go along with them – I could always find my way back). Therefore, ATVing was limited to the “Milner Trail” in the Salmon River Ranger District, a picturesque but somewhat boring 32-mile round trip to the (extinct) town of Florence, up and down an old logging road. The Bear Den RV Resort in Grangeville offered great early-morning clouds and evening sunsets, but that’s about it. Even the dead fish in the KOI pond did nothing for me!

Sunrise and Sunset at Bear Den RV…

On the Milner Trail…

Lastly, we spent an overnight in Hell’s Gate State Park, Lewiston before heading to Oregon via Washington – just another cold, overcast afternoon and evening! The Boss wanted to take a ride on the Hell’s Gate Scenic Byway to see the deepest river gorge in North America (Hell Canyon; a 10-mile wide canyon carved by the waters of the Snake River which flows more than 1 mile below the canyon’s west rim on the Oregon side and 7,400 feet below the peaks of Idaho’s Seven Devils Mountains range), but it was just too far away… Oh, well – I got to ride in the truck with the window down!

Day 68 – South Dakota through Wyoming and briefly, Montana

Akaska, SD – nowhere to go, nothing to do at the D&S Campground; truly the middle of podunk.  Evidently the only kind of humans to stay here are big-game hunters and fishermen, neither of which apply to Mr.Big.  On the one night we were there the sunset was awesome and I was allowed to (and really liked) walking up and down the middle of the road – leashed, of course.

Onward to Midland, SD and the East Belvidere KOA and another one-nighter. The highlite was driving through the Cheyenne River Reservation; it was very green.

20160822_105524

 

While in Spearfish, SD B&B did some ATVing in the Black Hills National Forest and some gambling (surprise, surprise) in Deadwood. They must be getting sick of the western cuisine because, after only one lunch in Deadwood, there was no more dining out. I hope they know that they don’t need to worry about wasting food as I will eat almost any type of leftovers!  We stayed at the Elkhorn Ridge RV Resort which had a huge grassy dog park (I made a bee-line for it each time we went out for a walk) and great wi-fi (as if I really care).  One day we all went for a drive out to Spearfish Canyon and found the site where the “Winter Camp” scenes in Dances With Wolves was filmed.  Of course Mr.Big had to rush home and watch the movie later that night!  The best part of our stay was the afternoon of the thunder, lightning, and hail storm – I’m not afraid of thunder (a lot of dogs are), but I did not like the sound of moth-ball sized hail pummeling the Enterprise – it not only hurt my ears, but I thought the windows were going to break.

Elkhorn Ridge RV Resort…

Spearfish Canyon and the Dances With Wolves Film Site

ATVing in the Black Hills National Forest

Thunder, lightning, and hail…